Watching, Rooting, and Supporting this thing called "The New Cuba" (Cuba Specialist | Production | Sensei)

Posts tagged ‘cuba’

11dominguez-inyt-web-master768-v2-1.jpg
(Illustration: Jasper Rietman for NY Times)

Tomorrow is January 20th. It’s official. Mr Trump will now be our President, and despite all the other issues to face internationally, this blog post is about one thing only — How “the Donald” will be handling Cuba/US relations and how you as an American can help shape policy and public sentiment.

On this first day at the Sundance Film Festival, we’d like to remind you to keep an eye on these films shot in Cuba. Mostly because they all exhibit a strong spirit of engagement, entering feet into the country to better understand the daily lives of our neighbors just 90 miles south.

What is the latest on the overall relations as we enter this new administration? Here’s the fat and skinny.

FROM THE US:
“All of the concessions Barack Obama has granted the Castro regime were done through executive order”, declares Trump, “which means the next president can reverse them, and that I will do so unless the Castro regime meets our demands.”

FROM CUBA:
“Aggression, pressure, conditions, impositions do not work with Cuba. This is not the way to attempt to have even a minimally civilized relationship with Cuba”, said Josefina Vidal, a foreign ministry department head (as told to the Guardian).

We realize this looks like a runaway train in a bad action movie. The train is going to drive off the cliff, right? Well, maybe not. That is, if you believe in “People Power”. Ok, so it didn’t work so well with the popular vote during elections (by over 3 million), but Americans DID gather in solidarity over the Dakota Access Pipeline. A coalition of climate activists  and native Americans managed to raise enough awareness which resulted in the rerouting of the pipeline away from Sioux Reservation. As an idealist, I believe it’s our duty to exercise this “people power” each and every day. Before I begin spelling out action points for this particular cause, allow me to explain the landscape briefly.

We have come a long way in the last 2 years under Obama’s normalization era. While the Obama Administration has eased certain travel and trade restrictions, only Congress can lift the embargo. We have seen what isolation tactics have accomplished in the past 55 years — zilch. Just a bitter relationship between both nations. We have already seen that a policy change from hostility to one of engagement has benefited the Cuban people more in the past two years than in the last 50 years combined.

Improving the daily lives and human rights of the Cuban people is a top priority of normalizing relations with Cuba. For the past 55 years, the only people who have been hurt by the embargo are the Cuban people, as well as US Companies. Isn’t Trump’s mandate to create more jobs in the US? Will Raul Castro and Trump be able to strike a new deal? Essentially, the embargo has failed. Logically speaking, no business in the world would continue a strategy that has failed for 55 years. It has ended up punishing the Cuban people and isolating us from the rest of the world, especially our other allies in Central and South America.

29cubatrump129cubatrump-master675.jpg
(Obama meets with Raul in March 2016. Photo: Stephen Crowley/The New York Time)

Re-engagement is driving change on the island that is empowering the Cuban people.

Here’s a few main points to consider:

Cuba’s Private Sector:
Cuba’s private sector is the fastest growing industry in Cuba’s economy, estimated to have grown to about 1/3 of Cuba’s workforce. This boom in private sector employment is fueled by tourism – which would dramatically increase if we lift the embargo. The over 4,000 private restaurant owners, and 28,000 bed & breakfast owners, the growing number of taxi drivers, half a million private farmers, and millions more private sector employees in the tourism sector would benefit tremendously from lifting the embargo.

Increased Tourism benefits the Cuban People:
Increased travel to Cuba is fueling private sector growth that is empowering Cubans across the island. Cuba is becoming the number 1 tourist destination in the Caribbean. International tourism has skyrocketed, and with the reestablishment of commercial flights, experts expect a huge increase in American travel. The influx of American travel will come with certain expectations – expectations that cell phones will work, credit cards will work, access to internet won’t be severely limited – this will foster the kind of change that will not only benefit American travelers, but Cubans across the island. (p.s. As an American, you can travel to North Korea, Syria, Saudi Arabia — but you can’t travel to Cuba as a tourist. Cuba is the only country in the world that the U.S. government prohibits tourist travel)

Access to Internet:
In this era of relaxed relations, recently, the price of internet has been reduced to $1.50 cucs p/hr, down from $2 cucs. The State is also launching some home internet connections in Havana Vieja, as well as wiring the entire Malecon street with wifi early next year (which requires a paid login with a Nauta card). Just a few weeks ago, Google signed a deal with Cuba’s ETECSA to install servers on Cuban soil for faster service. Although some of the internet expansion are purely internal decisions, it is however, a perfect climate to work with American brands such as Google or other digital entities seeking to improve connectivity on the island. This benefits all Cuban people.

International Credibility:
Year after year after year, every nation in the world, except the U.S. and Israel, votes at the United Nations General Assembly to condemn the U.S. embargo on Cuba. But even Israel trades with Cuba. Continuing 55 years of failed policy that has been repeatedly and publicly condemned by the international community as pointless and ineffective is weakening our stance abroad. Lifting the embargo would in fact strengthen our international credibility, not the other way around. Also, major international human rights organizations like Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and Oxfam all publicly support lifting the embargo because they believe it makes it harder to improve human rights.

Polling:
75% of U.S. adults approve of the decision last year to re-establish U.S. relations with Cuba, while nearly as many (73%) favor ending the long-standing U.S. trade embargo against Cuba, according to a new national survey by Pew Research Center conducted Dec. 1-5. Also, it is important to note that Florida did not go Trump because of the Cuban-American population. Trump’s Florida win was in fact due to votes from white voters in the I-4 corrider section of Florida. The Cuban-American vote was a non-factor. (read this thoroughly researched article on what happened in Florida). In fact, 63% of Cuban-Americans in Miami-Dade county support lifting the embargo, according to a FIU poll released Sep., 2016. In fact, Hillary actually out-performed Obama in Miami-Dade — a testament to how far Cuban-Americans have evolved in this area of discussion.

88fa8acd133c47e3a4b0cd8f3299a6d3_18.jpg
(Cubans stand in support of the opening of the US Embassy in Cuba, 2016)

WHAT DO CUBANS WANT?

Mostly all Cubans I have spoken to on the island welcome the reconciliation efforts made by President Obama. After half a century of butting heads, both sides are fatigued from the hostility. It was evident when you saw the faces of joyful Cubans during Obama’s visit. A young journalist, Elaine Diaz Rodriguez (the editor-in-chief of a Havana-based independent news digital magazine, Periodismo de Barrio) expressed it bluntly yet eloquently when describing this new “frenemies” relationship between US and Cuba.

“There can be no true friendship between the governments of Cuba and the United States. They represent two opposing political systems and the first has long been denying the right of the second to exist and vice versa. The most we can expect is tolerance and respect. And that is exactly what we achieved, in a way, after December 17,2014 under Barack Obama’s administration”. She continues, “but people do not have to play by the same rules as governments. There has always been true friendship between the people of Cuba and the people of the US”.

The rest of how this story plays out will take time. We presume it will be a slow burning relationship that needs to be fostered and healed over the next few years, as we focus instead on the few things we DO have in common, as well as our general mutual interests.

56efe5b3c46188cd198b45ba.jpg
(Young Cubans enthusiastic to catch a glimpse of their first US President visit in 88 years when Obama strolled  through Havana Vieja, March 2016. Photo: © Carlos Barria / Reuters)

Elaine closes her letter to Trump with the affirmative answer: “Both leaders have spoken loudly: we want relationships, we want embassies, we want the negotiations to keep going, we want to reach an agreement in every area and we are open to dialogue. We people want to be close, not far. We want to build bridges, not walls”.

It’s safe to say that lots of Cubans feel as she does. And now for the next steps.

—————————————

GET INVOLVED

To affect real change as Americans, we need to mobilize our constituents around the US. If you’re an American and are in favor of bettering Cuba/US relations, here is a basic overview of how “people power’ can help push this forward.

screen-shot-2016-12-23-at-11-11-53-pm.png

Contact your representative:
Constituents outreach has been incredibly helpful in gaining support from Republican members of Congress for lifting the embargo.  Here is a link with a sample script for folks to call Congressional offices, as well as a sample letter to send to Representatives. Although the majority of my readers are from LA, NY, MIAMI, I strongly encourage everyone to reach out to Republican members of Congress.

Contact the Administration:
While only Congress can lift the embargo, as you know, the Administration has a lot of latitude in terms of easing or tightening sanctions. Trump’s nominee for Treasury is Steve Mnuchin (read about the Hollywood movie financier). So to all my Hollywood friends and readers, if you have a connection to Mnuchin, reach out and urge him not to roll back changes. A lot of the regulatory changes have happened through the Dept. of Treasury.

Donate:
Here is a link to donate to the Engage Cuba Foundation. Engage Cuba is a national coalition of private business, organizations, and local leaders dedicated to advancing federal legislation to lift the embargo. Currently, there are three bipartisan bills that Engage Cuba is actively advocating for in Congress. Read more about their legislative priorities here. If you care about the embargo being dropped, this is the organization to support. Donations to the Engage Cuba Foundation (a 501(c)3 non-profit) are tax deductible.

Read:
1- Book: Open for Business, Building the New Cuban Economy to better understand the new private sector in Cuba, and the need to support Cuban entrepreneurs.
2- Newsletter: Go to EngageCuba.org and subscribe to their newsletter to stay in the loop on Cuba/US Affairs.

Go online and voice your opinion:
If you’re at Sundance this week and if these films resonate with you, post a social media message or write a blog post (if you’re not at the festival, spread the word anyways).

SAMPLE TWEET:

1- We ask Trump not to rollback regulations on Cuba. See #GiveMeFuture @Diplo @MajorLazer to see real engagement #LiftTheEmbargo @Engage_Cuba

2- It’s time to engage w/Cuba & show solidarity with the Cuban people #GiveMeFuture #LiftTheEmbargo @Engage_Cuba @majorlazer

1 Comment

Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 11.11.53 PM.png

Utah is getting a big injection of Cuban fever at the start of 2017. We’ve spent the better part of the year reading about the importance of Cuba/US engagement from media outlets like New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and a myriad of other outlets. Journalists have played an important role in opening this discussion while reporting a balanced story line.

This Jan 2017, it’s the filmmakers and artists who will show us what exactly engagement looks like. We’ll see curious cameras entering homes, filmmakers having “on the ground” discussions with every day Cubans, and putting a mirror up to Cuban society. None of the films are about the normalization process per say, but each of the tales are of everyday life — an American concert on the malecon, the only State-run phone company in Cuba (ETECSA), the selling of a home in Cuba, and a school that teaches English to Cubans, and more. Because all these films were captured in 2016, it is all the more reason to pay attention to what these local Cubans are expressing as we enter the Trump administration in 2017. It will take an act of Congress to fully lift the US embargo, but the more that Americans understand Cuban society today, the better it will respond to its needs in order to grow and prosper in this new era. We cannot affect Cuban policy, but we CAN affect American policy through phonecalls to our legislators, and shifting the American consciousness towards a more open relationship with Cuba. Of course Cuba will need to determine their own future, but these films are a peek into a society seeking to redefine itself.

Screen Shot 2016-12-21 at 9.53.40 PM.png
(Casa en Venta – a short film on the the new real estate sector for homeowners)

I’m lucky enough to have worked on two of these films (Films #1 and #2 below) which will premiere at the festival this January, one as a Story Producer and the other as a Cuba Production Consultant. Upon entering Pre-Production, each of the teams asked a bevy of questions which opened healthy dialogue — including the current state of Cuba, its relation to the US, its complex history, its challenges with filmmaking, the US Embargo laws, the tone of questions permitted, the current reforms in Cuba, the spectrum of characters, etc. etc. It seems that answering one question in Cuba begets another 50 questions. Something as simple as weak internet on the island poses enormous challenges during production, including emailing local staff or sending large files to the States. It’s a rabbit hole of lessons, but each production diligently pressed forward and managed to capture their stories with tight deadlines, frustrating conditions, an open heart, and limited budgets. Together, both films bookmark the gamut of the population today — from the elder tales of Buena Vista Social Club to the hungry young tech scene of Major Lazer’s audience. One film presents the bowing out of an older generation, while the other film introduces the future of Cuba. Both generations are very dear to me, and both being an honor to explore with Directors Austin and Lucy respectively (and their film families) who all came to Cuba in 2016.

Screen Shot 2016-12-21 at 9.44.17 PM.png
(Conectifai – a short film on Cuba’s phone company and internet status)

The other 3 films playing at the Sundance Film Festival this January are mini docs, but despite their short length, they are all paramount stories to explore in Cuba today. These include the story of technology today (the phone company and the emerging internet), the new home “buyers market”, and the tale of a small school that teaches Cubans to speak English as they prepare to work with “La Yuma” (nickname for the Americans).

All three storylines share the urgency of Cuba’s desire to integrate into the global economy and international community. The most interesting part of these 3 shorts is that it was nurtured by an American Institute, Sundance Labs (who attended the Havana Film Festival the last two Decembers to workshop scripts and stories with local filmmakers). Together, the 3 shorts are presented as a collection entitled “Made in Cuba”, an an example of the Sundance Institute’s “longstanding commitment to international artists” says Paul Federbush who spearheads the lab. These films were guided by the Institute’s Documentary Film Program in collaboration with La Escuela Internacional de Cine y TV (EICTV) and Guardian documentaries.

… and now a breakdown of all 5 films:

Screen Shot 2016-12-26 at 6.57.46 PM.png1- Give Me Future: Major Lazer in Cuba – Director: Austin Peters / USA – FEATURE FILM

In the spring of 2016, global music sensation Major Lazer performed a free concert in Havana, Cuba—an unprecedented show that drew an audience of almost half a million. This concert documentary evolves into an exploration of youth culture in a country on the precipice of change. World Premiere U.S.A., Cuba

Austin Peters is a director living in New York. Raised in Los Angeles, he went on to study film at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. He has directed two short-form documentaries: Braids, starring Lupita Nyong’o for Vogue, and NYC, 1981, a companion piece to the recent film A Most Violent Year. His music videos for Chvrches’ “Empty Threat” was named one of the 10 best music videos of 2015 by Rolling Stone

Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 11.06.50 PM.png2- Buena Vista Social Club Doc / “Untitled” -Dir: Lucy Walker / USA,UK-FEATURE FILM

The musicians of the Buena Vista Social Club exposed the world to Cuba’s vibrant culture with their landmark 1997 album. Now, against the backdrop of Cuba’s captivating musical history, hear the band’s story as they reflect on their remarkable careers and the extraordinary circumstances that brought them together. World Premiere.

Lucy Walker is an Emmy Award–winning director and two-time Academy Award–nominee. She is renowned for creating riveting, character-driven nonfiction that delivers emotionally and narratively. Her films—including Waste Land, The Crash Reel, Devil’s Playground, The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, and The Lion’s Mouth Opens—have won over 100 awards and honors. Her new film, the untitled Buena Vista Social Club documentary, is her fifth feature (and ninth film) to screen in official Sundance Film Festival selection.

Screen Shot 2016-12-26 at 7.01.58 PM.png3- “Connection” or “Conectifai” – Dir: Zoe Garcia

ETECSA—Cuba’s only telephone company—installed Wi-Fi routers in 18 public parks in 2016. For many Cubans, this meant being able to go online for the first time. Now connected to a technology that is entirely new to them, we see how Cubans explore social media, online dating, and the ability to reconnect with family members living just 90 miles away. U.S. Premiere
Director Zoe Garcia graduated in mass communication studies, specializing in photography, at the Higher Institute of Art in Havana, Cuba. In 2008 she took a course on documentary cinema and TV at the International School of Film and TV in Cuba. Garcia has worked as a screenwriter, assistant director, and photographer.

Screen Shot 2016-12-21 at 9.50.48 PM.png4- Film: “Great Muy Bien” – Dir: Sheyla Pool

After the United States restored diplomatic relations with Cuba in 2015, it was no longer unrealistic for Cubans to dream of one day living and working abroad. Citizens of all ages, with diverse aspirations, enroll at the makeshift Big Ben English school in Havana in order to prepare themselves for a future of normalized relations between Cuba and the United States.

Director Sheyla Pool graduated from the University of Havana in Hispanic languages and in sound from the International School of Film and TV at San Antonio de los Baños. She wrote and directed Protege a tu familia and Frágil. Pool was a consultant for the script of Esteban. Currently she is working on the script for Vínculos.

Screen Shot 2016-12-21 at 9.49.24 PM.png5- “Casa en Venta” or “House for Sale” – Dir: Emanuel Giraldo

After over 50 years, the ban disallowing citizens of Cuba from selling their own houses is lifted. Three Cuban families invite us into their homes as a showcase to prospective buyers — to hear their “sales pitch.” Filled with memories, souvenirs, and family members, these intimate spaces are filled with affection, highlighting a country on the verge of historical change.

Director Emanuel Giraldo Betancur was born in Medellin, Columbia in 1989 and graduated in film directing from the International School of Cinema and Television. Some of his projects are 1,2,3. . . Let’s Dance! and Amapearte. In December 2015, he participated in Nuevas Miradas in Cuba with House for Sale (2016 Sheffield Doc/Fest), which was supported by Sundance Institute’s Documentary Film Program.

———————

Stay tuned for more information as these films screen at the festival (or follow @TheNewCuba on Instagram for live activities).

For media inquiries, contact Jauretsi at jauretsi@gmail.com

Leave a comment

screen-shot-2016-10-14-at-6-56-45-pm

Hurricane Matthew just passed 1 week ago through both Cuba and Haiti, leaving major devastation in both our wakes. Record shopping in Havana a few days ago, this album seemed to have found me. Probably because my mind is there this moment. In Haiti, Cuba is already present and pitching in. Members of the Cuban Medical Brigade, some 648 Cuban doctors and other professionals, remain on site. They are expected to offer medical care and disease-prevention efforts in the aftermath of the storm, including a recent outbreak of Cholera.

martha-jean-claude
In all these thoughts, I wanted Haitian music marinating in my home, and then this sleeve popped in my sight, so I took the calling. I had never heard of Martha Jean Claude before and it turned out her voice is so captivating, so I wanted to know more. I learned that this woman had deep connections to the Haitian people through her folkloric and voodoo lyrics. She was not just a actress, singer, dancer, but also a philanthropist and activist. As an avid speaker of the abuse of the masses, it led to her arrest in 1952. After her play “Anriette” was released, officials deemed it anti-government so she was imprisoned, and eventually released 2 days before the birth of her child. Fearing for her life, she exiled to Cuba in 1952 (before the 1959 Cuban Revolution) with her husband, Cuban journalist, Victor Marabel. Martha eventually became an international legend, touring Paris to New York to Angola using her soulful voice to share her protest music against injustice. After 3 decades in exile, the homesick Martha finally returned to her motherland in 1986 after the fall of Jean Claude Duvalier, where she held a legendary homecoming concert.

After that, she returned to Cuba, a place she called her second home — the name of her album: “Soy Mujer de Dos Islas” (I Am A Woman of 2 Islands). She passed away in her Havana home in 2001. I just recently discovered that Cuban Painter, Michel Mirabel calls Martha Jean Claude his “Mamita” (but she is truly his grandmother from his dads side). It’s a beautiful merging of both worlds since Michel’s artwork is coincidentally displayed on the first US approved credit card in Cuba (MC) issued by Stonegate Bank this year. Michel also received attention this Spring 2016 when Usher came to Cuba and visited his studio. Here’s a toast to riding on the shoulders of our ancestors, and pushing the storyline forward at all times.

This post is also a nod to the true Grand Dame of Haitian music, and the people who are keeping it real this week helping on the ground. Donate to Waves for Water (Matthew Haiti Relief) or follow @jon_rose to see his daily diary of providing clean water to people on the ground. To use his words “Basically it’s this simple — the more support we get, the more people get access to clean water. Period. Thank you to everyone who has stepped up to help us so far”.

Leave a comment

So you’ve arrived in Cuba, and you need to check your emails. If it’s your first time, and if you are staying at a major hotel, you can easily check your emails in the hotel lobby, with the purchase of internet login codes at the business center. These codes will allow you tap into Wifi for 1 hour intervals.

However, if you are staying at cute little “casa particular” AKA, a private residence (thank you Air BnB), The wifi situation can be a little confusing. Fear not, below is a guide.

IMG_0776
(Wifi access at the Parque Coyula, in Playa, Havana. Photo: Jauretsi)

In June 2015, the Cuban state installed 35 WiFi’s in the country. These are not free Wifi parks, but rather, one can log into Wifi with the usage of a Nauta card (Nauta cards are sold by the only Cuban phone company, named ETECSA).

WHAT IS NAUTA?

Local Cubans (and foreigners alike) log into the internet using scratch-off cards from the company NAUTA. These cards can be purchased at the local phone company, ETECSA for $2 CUCS. Most tourists do not purchase these cards at the ETECSA offices, simply because the lines are too long, and you’ll find yourself wasting a full afternoon on your vacation (did we mention each person is only offered a 3 card limit purchase per person per day when bought at ETECSA?).

_1189_30536472b898bffL

_1189_305431306c543a7L
(Internet Log in Cards, in very high demand in Cuba)

The smart move is to troll outside most Wifi spots until you hear a local voice pass by you uttering these words under their breath: “tarjeta de internet” [tar-he-ta-de-eeent-er-net]. This is usually a local resident selling NAUTA cards on the black market for $3 CUCS. It only costs 1 CUC more, but you’ll be able to buy a bigger wad of cards in one shot. Welcome to Cuba’s black market, offering an efficient service at a slightly higher cost (but worth it for the convenience). Hello Capitalism.

Two good spots to purchase the black market Nauta cards is the exterior of Habana Libre Hotel (near the outside stairs of Havanatur office) and Miramar Business Center (front of building). If you’re feeling brave enough to weather the long lines of ETECSA, there is also an office tucked inside the Miramar Business Center. For additional places, just ask word-of-mouth once you arrive. Most Cubans are helpful with routing you to buy a NAUTA card.

 

IMG_0960 copy
(Vedado Park. Photo: Jauretsi)

PARKS THAT ALLOW LOGIN VIA NAUTA CARD

• La Rampa (from the Malecón up to cine Yara in Vedado),

• Parque de 51 in La Lisa,

• Parque Coyula in Playa/Miramar,

• El Anfiteatro de Marianao y el Paseo de la Villa Panamericana

• Parque Mónaco in 10 de Octubre;

• Pabellones Central and 14 at Expocuba (Parque Lenin)

• Calle 23, near Nacional Hotel (see Map for exact cross streets)

• Parque Fe del Valle in Havana Centro (Galeano y San Rafael)

vedado
(A few of the public Wifi spots in Vedado, opened last year)

HOTELS THAT ALLOW LOGIN VIA NAUTA CARD:

• Parque Central – You will also need to purchase food or drink in the lobby.

• Hotel Inglaterra – You will also need to purchase food or drink in the lobby.

• Hotel Santa Isabel (Habana Vieja) note: this hotel has a weak Wifi signal, but it’s a charming hotel to stay if Wifi is not important during your trip.

HOTEL DIRECT LOGINS – No Nauta Cards here

Specific large State-Run Hotels have instituted their own “sign-ins” for a nominal fee. These hotels do not allow a visitor to log into Wifi using a Nauta card ($2-3 CUCS). These hotels charge a larger fee. There are pro’s and cons to logging in this way.

The first one being that if you need quick service, you can walk into these hotels and pay a premium price to log in ASAP, without chasing NAUTA cards on the street. Instant gratification, if you will. The con, of course, is that this option is more expensive.

Please note that when purchasing your “hour of internet”, that each hotel offers a code which expires quickly. It is important to note, because, for example, if you purchase Hotel Nacional login, the codes expire within 24 hours. If you do not return to the hotel within 24 hours, you will lose remaining unused minutes. Some hotels with Wifi include:

• Saratoga, Habana Vieja (10 CUC per hour) the code expires within 1 month

• Melia Cohiba, Vedado (10 CUC per hour) the code expires within 1 week

• Nacional Hotel, Centro Habana (10 CUC per hour) – the code expires within 24 hours

• El Presidente (4.50 CUC)

• Melia (Habana, Miramar)

More hotel options with Wifi options:

• Hotel Chateau, Miramar

• Montehabana, Miramar.

• Panorama, Miramar.

• Occidental Miramar, Miramar.

• Sevilla Hotel, Vieja.

• Plaza Hotel, Vieja.

IMG_0916 copy
(Vedado Park. Photo: Jauretsi)

THINGS THAT CAN HURT YOUR LOGIN

PHONE MODELS: iPhones tend to be trickier devices to pick up wifi signals in Cuba. Traditionally, Samsung phones (Androids) log onto ETECSA Wifi quicker than iPhones. With a little patience and tenacity to search a strong signal, both models will eventually log on.

RAINFALL: From personal experience, I’ve noticed that when heavy rain falls in Havana, that most major Wifi spots (for example, Melia Cohiba and Parque Central), are useless to log in. If you’re visiting Havana on a heavy rainfall week, I would not even bother attempting to login. If you do, prepare to lose your $10 CUCS while wrestling the whole hour with no success. Cuba has not quite understood the concept of “refunds”.

IMG_0915 copy
(Vedado Park. Photo: Jauretsi)

THE STATES CURRENT STANDING WITH INTERNET

This year, it was big news that Google offered to wire Cuba. 85 year old Jose Ramon Machado Ventura (Secretary of the Cuban Communist Party) rejected the gift that Google offered in July 2015 — that is, to install Free Wifi antennas for the country. His quote in the local state paper, Juventud Rebelde.

“Everyone knows why there isn’t more Internet access in Cuba, because it is costly. There are some who want to give it to us for free, but they don’t do it so that the Cuban people can communicate… Instead their objective is to penetrate us and do ideological work to achieve a new conquest. We must have Internet, but in our way, knowing that the imperialists intend to use it as a way to destroy the Revolution.” (Quote: HavanaTimes.org)

Ramon is kinda seen as part of the old guard revolutionary. Of course the other side, the hardline anti-Castro faction in Miami is having a field day with this quote and is angry that Cuba is not taking this favor. It’s so exhausting seeing these 2 forces ram heads together, like 2 stubborn rams.

While, of course I would love to see Cuba have free Wifi all over the country, it is very understandable that Cuba would have its guards up. Have we not forgotten the last US digital invasion through the usage of an absurd Cuban Twitter? Based on the USA’s latest covert operation, how could they be sure this is not another Trojan Horse?

I do firmly believe that Obama’s first visit to the island has reduced this paranoia, and hopefully paved the way to begin real open talks about lending digital infrastructure. This is a complicated trapeze walk for people on both sides looking to join forces. The 57 year ideological battle has created a deep wound, which is going to take more than 1 year to heal. With the US Presidents recent visit to Cuba, Obama announced that Google was indeed creating a deal to set up more WiFi on the island. Nobody quite understands how this will unfold, but nonetheless Google is attempting to help upgrade the island’s 2G wireless coverage. More here on this plan.

The most important thing to defend is that the Cuban people need internet… and they need it now. Access to information is everything. Stay tuned as the story of Internet evolves in Cuba.

Until that magic day arrives, good luck scratching off and logging in…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

bd-habana

Very excited for this new Biennial to hit Havana. With a tagline of Diseño y Prosperidad (Design & Prosperity) the first Design Biennial, called 1ra Bienal de Diseño La Habana — otherwise known as BDHabana 2016—will take place May 14–20, 2016. Open to design students and professionals worldwide, the Biennial’s first edition will feature exhibitions, symposia, and events in Havana, and in Camagüey and Santiago de Cuba.

Coordinated by Roberto Miguel Torres, the Biennial will explore issues of design and industry, creative innovation, and workshops to promote design as an element of socioeconomic development. To celebrate the exchange and promotion in relation to the presence of design in our lives towards a new reality.

Roberto Miguel Torres, who is the general secretary of the event´s Organizing Committee and director of Image and Promotion of the National Office of Design (ONDI), states: “We are referring to an event that will be first carried out on the island and its slogan acquire a higher importance given we are realizing about the presence of the design in our lives, so the prosperity cannot become an abstract concept; on the contrary, it is a necessity.” He added. “How could we have a prosperous nation? It would be by having a vision on the related development and innovation which are concepts that are certainly linked to the design and that is to say the way your office is designed, your house or the computer you are using, for instance, So we just cannot produce what is needed, we need to produce what is competitive, and it is right there where designer´s work starts.” (as reported in Cuban Art News)

Leave a comment

1.QUEST_BY_JAURETSI_6304(LORES)

Questlove was the first person to reach me after President Obama’s announcement to normalize relations with Cuba on December 17, 2014 and ask to visit Cuba. His heart and soul has been invested in the island nation since their Havana performance in 2002, always dreaming of the day he’d go back. Enter April 2015, there was finally a hole in his exhaustive schedule, including Late Night with Jimmmy Fallon, tucked just after Coachella 2014. Cuba, here we come. It was a hell of a memory.

In addition to two nights of DJing, Questlove made good use of his time in Havana, engaging in extensive cultural research both by digging up some classic Cuban-made vinyl and by visiting the legendary EGREM studios, where most–if not all–of those classic sessions were recorded. Upon reading some of the comments on YouTube under this video, I noticed a random viewer nodding at the mini-doc while mentioning the other American rapper, Jay Z, and his visit. “Hova didn’t do shit but photo op in Cuba” wrote Ricardo Herrera. Harsh words, but penetratingly honest. It’s going to be the responsibility of each powerful US artist to truly look beyond the veil when visiting the island.

It seems the only action that Jay took was returning home and penning an “open letter” song to the US Administration. I cannot comment on any deep “conversations-on-the-ground” that Jay had in Cuba (maybe he did, maybe he didn’t), but nonetheless, it would have been informative to get a more robust report of his activities with the Cuban youth and personal insights he gained of their struggles today, beyond the cigars, 1950’s cars, and fluffy State tour. I’m not dissing on Jay because I am aware of his philanthropic efforts in other areas, however, my plea to Hova is, “Don’t sleep on Cuba”. Visiting is not good enough. Go deeper. Especially the marginalized [and sometimes censored] hip hop scene, who need your guidance more than ever to speak their truths.

I’d like to thank the whole team who helped put this trip and video together. Let’s keep doing this!

Credits:

Directors: Jauretsi & Daniel Petruzzi
Cinematographer: Hector David Rosales
Sound Technician: Adrian Garcia
Editor: Jake Remingon
Executive Producer: Daniel Petruzzi for Okayplayer
Produced by: Edgar Productor n Jefe, Okayplayer, You and Me Inc.
Sugar Barons.
All Music Courtesy of: Edgaro Productor n Jefe & Maria Bacardi, MB Records

“Me Queda Voz (Instrumental)
Produced by Edgaro Productor n Jefe

“Cojimar” (Instrumental)
Produced by Edgaro Productor n Jefe

“Nunca Vida Mia”
Produced by Edgaro Productor n Jefe

“Nosotros” (Maria Bacardi Version)
Produced by Edgaro Productor n Jefe

Special Thanks to: EGREM, Fabrica de Arte Cubano, X Alfonso, Josue Garcia, La Rueda Producciones, Jorge Rodriguez, Joyce Alvarez aka Bjoyce, Tania Canet Iglesias, Cultural Island Travel

20150417_055048_14
(A Man whose “Soul is Fed”, Ahmir backstage after his DJ Performance at La Fabrica)

All photos: Jauretsi

Leave a comment